Blockbuster Content Marketing Success: Xerox Marketing VP Jeannine Rossignol #CMWorld

JRossignol---interview-header-

Everything is bigger on the silver screen: hopes and dreams, heroes and villains, successes and failures. Simple human drama can become mythical when projected onto a giant movie screen. We go to the movies to laugh, cry, and gasp along with our fellow moviegoers, all of us sitting in the dark together sharing the experience. It’s a powerful example of how great content can create an experience that not only informs, but makes you feel. Creating those experiences is a whole crew of specialists, actors, director and producers, each playing their part.

Similarly, every successful content marketing program has a team of people working behind the scenes to create quality content that connects with customers. One trailblazing example of a marketing leader creating great content experiences is Jeannine Rossignol, VP of Marketing for Large Enterprise Organizations at Xerox.

Jeannine will be making her first appearance at Content Marketing World this year, discussing how senior marketers and CMOs can structure marketing around content. I connected with Jeannine to talk about content marketing strategy, top challenges facing content marketers, and content marketing lessons to be learned from Charlotte’s Web.

I work with amazingly talented people to tell stories that start conversations with the right people.

Can you share a little more about your role at Xerox and what you enjoy most about it?

At Xerox I lead demand gen, content marketing, digital, social and sales enablement globally for our Large Enterprise Operations division. I work with amazingly talented people to tell stories that start conversations with the right people. I get a rush when I think about all the changes that have happened to the practice over the past few years and can’t wait to see what the future holds… and maybe even help shape it a bit.

The key is that content provides insight, and valuable information they need.

How do you define content marketing?

Content marketing provides our clients and prospects with the insight they need to make a decision. It doesn’t have to be the decision to buy. The key is that the content – whatever form it takes – provides insight, and valuable information they need. Otherwise, we’d simply keep calling it marketing brochures (collateral). When you’re elbowing for position in the early stages of the consideration, good content marketing works hard. It creates brand awareness, differentiation and credibility.

When it comes to approach, never forget the customer is in charge.

It seems many brands’ approach to content marketing has focused mostly on creating more content with a recent emphasis on better quality content. What do you think are the major drivers for content marketing strategy and approach to content?

I have a hunch that the brands producing the most content are often the ones that lack a clear content marketing strategy. A clear strategy should include who you target, what their buyer’s journey looks like, and most importantly, what are the questions they need to answer to move from one stage in the journey to the next. Every piece of content should go back to that strategy.

When it comes to approach, never forget the customer is in charge. Be engaging. Add humanity.

Content is an integral component of every aspect of marketing.

How does content marketing relate to the overall marketing pie?

Content is the golden thread that brings marketing together, not just marketing but marketing and sales. It isn’t a separate program, but rather an integral component of every aspect of marketing.

Content marketing is growing for two reasons. 1) Many disparate marketing components are now taking roles within a larger content marketing strategy. With some adjustments and refocus on customer interest, they have become content marketing tools. 2) Content marketing is also taking on a bigger role because so much of it can be tied to measurable results.

We have to recognize that not everyone wants to consume information the same way.

How important are non-text content marketing assets to your marketing? For example: audio, video, and interactive.

Critical. We have to recognize that not everyone wants to consume information the same way. Just as important as understanding the type of content your audience wants, you also have to know what format they prefer it in. Added to that, we are a visual society. Memes. Instagram. Buzzfeed. Pinterest. Emoticons. They help us connect in ways that can often feel more real than words. Which is great news for international marketers, by the way.

What are some of your own content marketing examples that you’re proudest of?

In B2B marketing, especially for services, we talk to our clients about their challenges. We took a different angle with Optimism. One that is focused on the opportunities for that business … looking past the challenges and focusing on opportunities … We were excited about it, our management and sales organizations were excited, and the feedback we’ve received from customers demonstrates they like it as well.

We brought the idea of Optimism to life with a publication called Chief Optimist.   We needed to get in front of decisions makers with our content. The idea of the publication seemed like a great way to get past the gatekeeper and end up in the “to-read” pile. We partnered with Forbes to publish the magazine. We knew their name would add credibility to the magazine, and most of all it would help us supplement our original content with theirs. As it turns out by partnering we are more credible than trying to do it on our own.

Do you have any advice for marketers who feel overwhelmed by the challenge of consistently producing a variety of engaging content?

  • Don’t do it alone! Partner – internal SMEs, 3rd party experts, your agencies, trusted business resources, analysts, etc.
  • Editorial calendar – map it out for the year, it won’t seem as overwhelming
  • Remember at the end of the day it is a person reading your content. Make sure it is interesting and has a point.
  • Never be afraid to fail. In today’s digital world it is easy to make course corrections, but you can’t correct (or learn from) what was never done.

Great technology can’t fix bad content, nor can great content deliver results without technology.

What are some of the biggest content marketing challenges facing large companies today? Or the biggest misconceptions. What should they do about it?

Content marketing can expose your “ugly baby.” If you have a product or service that doesn’t have a unique value prop or truly meet the needs of the marketplace, coming up with insightful content will be near impossible.

Great technology can’t fix bad content, nor can great content deliver results without technology.

Data hygiene is critically important. The best content is highly targeted and relevant. But if you can’t trust your data, you can make some silly mistakes on a massive scale.

Forgetting the first rule of content marketing: take your brand out and put the customer in.

Companies seem to be most challenged by measuring content marketing performance and ROI. What advice can you share?

Marketing went from not being able to measure anything, to being able to measure everything. It is overwhelming, but pick a place to start… pick one question you want to answer and go from there. Get it roughly right, and keep refining.

What are you presenting on at Content Marketing World? What do you like best about the conference?

I’m on the panel discussing “How Senior Marketers and CMOs Are Structuring Around Content Marketing. This will be my first CMWorld. I’m beyond excited; it has been on my list to attend for years. I would love to hear from veteran attends, tweet to me what you like best about the conference.

In the spirit of the CMWorld conference theme of vintage Hollywood “Big Lights, Big Content”, what is your favorite movie?

There are so many to choose from… I’m the mother of 4 small children so bear with me; the only movies I see these days are children’s movies! Let me give you a favorite that is not only a great movie/story, but also a great example of content marketing in action: Charlotte’s Web. Charlotte’s content, the words she spun in her web were creative, powerful and beautifully targeted to save the life of Wilbur the pig. It perfectly showcases that content can deliver powerful results, or in this case, save lives!

Ready to Become the Star of Your Brand’s Content Marketing Movie?

Reserve your space at Content Marketing World 2015 to learn strategies from over 200 top experts in the industry.

For a preview of coming attractions before the conference, dim the lights, silence your electronic devices, and read our new eBook, Measuring Your Content Marketing Box Office Success.

Binge Read the Entire Content Marketing World Triple Feature!

eBook covers - cmw15

Sometimes when you get really into a series, there is nothing more tortuous than waiting for the next release. By clicking any of the links below, you’ll get immediate, on-demand access to each of the eBooks in our series.

The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy

Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing

Measuring Content Marketing Box Office Success


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
Blockbuster Content Marketing Success: Xerox Marketing VP Jeannine Rossignol #CMWorld | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Blockbuster Content Marketing Success: Xerox Marketing VP Jeannine Rossignol #CMWorld appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Advertisements

Most Efficient Solar Panels



(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

In trying to create the most efficient solar panels, pay special attention to the portion of the backsheet of the panels.

A backsheet layer is the solar panel which solar cells are arranged. The other side of this backsheet, more precisely in the upper middle area is the junction box. A backsheet are often made of vinyl fluoride or PVF which is similar to PVC, or polyvinyl chloride, the material used in pipes and water pipes. P.V.F. It is commonly used in aircraft interiors and vehicles.

DuPont, the US chemical company founded in 1802, created in the 1940s, polyvinyl fluoride polymer (PVF). After about 10 years, they have begun to develop products according to the invented material. 20 years after the invention, the trade name Tedlar was finally registered by DuPont in the United States. Finally, Tedlar has become the first choice of material for the back sheets of solar panels and is also recognized as the standard in other industries it serves.

Polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) has excellent release properties so it is easy to clean. It is also weatherproof and can prevent water from entering the solar cell. It also does a good job keeping the steam penetrate. Another important feature of the FSP is their low thermal resistance, which is essential in the operation of solar cells. Low heat resistance means that the material is capable of supporting the solar cell heat transfer that can affect layers that compose it. This is also why some solar panels do not work as expected when the temperature exceeds 25 degrees C (77 degrees F). All solar panels on its data sheet have a term called “temperature coefficient Pmax” and this determines the percentage of yield reduction for each additional degree above 25 degrees Celsius. If the “temperature coefficient Pmax” is -0.47%, the maximum power from your solar panel is reduced by 0.47% for each degree increase in temperature (Celsius). Conversely, when the temperature is less than or equal to 25 degrees Celsius, the most efficient solar cells and may increase above its nominal power.

Making the most efficient solar panels requires high quality materials such as Tedlar, but if you make one on your own, an alternative would be just a plain plywood. This painting plated against, with a protective coating such as acrylic latex paint to do the job in UV resistant and prevent water ingress. Plywood is also nonconductive, but may not have low thermal resistance that has PVF.

How to Create Oscar-Worthy Content Marketing: Ann Handley of MarketingProfs #CMWorld

AHandley---interview-header-

My pal Ann Handley has made it her life’s work to, in her words, “wage war on mediocrity in content.” Her best-selling book, Everybody Writes, is a practical guide to writing the kind of content that truly engages an audience.

As the Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs (the world’s first Chief Content Officer, in fact), Ann advocates quality over quantity in all of her content ventures. She also spreads the gospel of good content at speaking engagements around the world, including the upcoming Content Marketing World conference September 8-11 in Cleveland.

To get a sneak preview of Ann’s Content Marketing World presentation, Good Content Vs. Good Enough Content: A Fight For Sore Eyes, I did my best to catch up with her during some pretty crazy travels. Along the way, she shared her journey on learning to write compelling content, the role of technology in content marketing, and the death of the marketing funnel.

My mission is always to make the complicated way simpler.

As the CCO of MarketingProfs, best-selling author, keynote speaker, lover of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and the most influential woman in Social Media (according to Forbes), when you look back on your journey throughout your career what are three things you never lost focus on that helped you get to where you are today?

  1. When I was in journalism school, my professor Charlie Ball used to tell me, “Remember: No one has to read this.” That perspective changed my writing from self-indulgent (all about me) to reader-centric (all about the audience). It’s been invaluable as a content-centric marketer and blogger and (frankly) as a person.

(Side note to parents — of either a human, dog, cat, ferret, lizard, llama, or otherwise: Parenting reaffirms this idea. Because nothing is about you. Ever again. And I say that in the best possible way.)

  1. Charlie also told me: “No one will complain that you made things too simple to understand.” Life is complicated. Business is messy. “Solutions” are multi-faceted. If I’m being honest, most things in life confuse me. My mission is always to make the complicated way simpler.
  1. Finally: Deliver. Seth Godin calls this: Ship.

When I was in high school, the Pope visited Boston. I went to Catholic high school, where I was the editor of the school paper. I told the school I’d cover it for us. (The nuns were thrilled!)

But then I changed my mind, and I blew off the Pope’s visit to go hang out with my local public school friends. And when I got home that day, my Mom was unusually annoyed at me. I didn’t understand why — who cares? The Pope’s visit was all over the news anyway.

And my mom said, lips pursed and on the verge of losing it, “Because you had a responsibility to your position, and you ignored it for your own pleasure.”

At the time, I thought she was being ridiculously prissy. (I still feel bad to this day about my eye roll in response.)

But now, I get it. I said I’d do something, and then I didn’t. That’s not cool.

How I internalize that now: If you say you’ll do something, do it. Your word is more important than you might imagine it is.

You can’t code creativity. And you can’t program publishing. And quality definitely trumps quantity.

Your session at Content Marketing World will focus on helping marketers nail the basics of creating good content. What do you anticipate are the primary challenges for marketers today in creating quality content versus a quantity of content?

I’ve been thinking lately about technology. Because increasingly it’s heralded as the savior (or legitimizer?) of marketing.

Robots can write your posts. Tools can optimize them. Solutions can amplify them.

Awesome. I heart technology. I built my career on it, too.

But guess what? Technology is only as good as our story.

You can’t code creativity. And you can’t program publishing. And quality definitely trumps quantity. Always has. Always will.

Your story is the thing that sets your apart. So the question is: What’s your story? And how do you tell it?

There’s a growing rumbling in the marketing industry about the death of the funnel. Yea or nay?

The funnel was never a funnel. It’s always been an ecosystem, because the people who buy (the people at the end of the “funnel”) have always had the capacity to influence the decision of others. Social tools and technology make that information way more accessible, is all.

Which makes your sales and marketing efforts like the song that never ends. It just goes on and on, my friend, to quote Lamb Chop. (Is this the first time Shari Lewis has been quoted in a marketing context?)

What are your favorite examples of B2B or B2C brands that are creating great content for marketing?

B2B

B2C

Nonprofit

Government

  • This was a failed attempt, because the candidate didn’t get elected. But I believe it was groundbreaking storytelling in political marketing – The Best Political Ad Ever

What’s ordinary to you isn’t often ordinary to others.

Incorporating storytelling into content marketing has always been a big focus of yours. What advice would you give to marketers to help uncover these stories, even if they think they might not have any worth sharing?

Every company has a story to tell, if you look at the world from your customer’s point of view. The designer Michael Wolff says, “What already exists is an inspiration.”

Train yourself to look at things differently. What’s ordinary to you isn’t often ordinary to others.

What is the best piece of marketing advice that you’ve ever received personally?

“The best marketing doesn’t feel like marketing.” — Tom Fishburne (Marketoonist.com)

He didn’t say it to me personally — although he’s a friend, so he probably would if I asked him to. Regardless, I’ve internalized it as if he did. I’m not exaggerating when I say that I think of it every day.

Content Marketing World attendees, you are my people.

What do you like best about attending and speaking at Content Marketing World?

Content Marketing World attendees, you are my people. It’s not quite like being with family — but there’s a similar feel of a kind of posse.

“Community” is one of those words that’s overplayed in marketing. But CMW (and a few other select marketing events throughout the year) embody it for me.

Thanks, Ann!

Ready to Create Oscar-Caliber Content Marketing?

Reserve your space at Content Marketing World 2015 for inspiring and informative presentations from 200 superstars of marketing.

For a sneak preview of Ann and 13 other marketing matinee idols’ presentations, grab your popcorn and settle in with our new eBook, Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing.

Stay Tuned For the Thrilling, Final Chapter in Our Triple Content Marketing Feature!

CMWorld 2015 eBooks

On June 22, we will premiere the final chapter in our content marketing triple feature: Measuring Your Content Marketing Box Office Success. Featuring content marketing stars such as Joe Pulizzi, Andrew Davis, Michael Brenner and many more, you’ll be able to connect the content marketing performance dots with the strategy and tactics shared in the first two eBooks.


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
How to Create Oscar-Worthy Content Marketing: Ann Handley of MarketingProfs #CMWorld | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post How to Create Oscar-Worthy Content Marketing: Ann Handley of MarketingProfs #CMWorld appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Learn How to Land Your Content a Leading Role: Jay Acunzo of NextView Ventures #CMWorld

JAcunzo---interview-header-

A talented movie director makes sure that actors give an authentic performance that will emotionally affect the intended audience. A good content marketing strategist has the same goal: authenticity that creates audience engagement. And just like a movie director, content marketers are expected to deliver on time, under budget, and follow up each hit with a fresh blockbuster.

Jay Acunzo, VP of Platform & Content at NextView Ventures, has built his career on getting star-making performances out of content. He began as a Digital Media Strategist at Google and has spent time managing content for Dailybreak Media and HubSpot. In his position at NextView, Jay helps startup entrepreneurs with education and business development including content marketing strategies that addresses tech startups’ unique marketing challenges.

In advance of his presentation at the 2015 Content Marketing World conference, I interviewed Jay about the importance of personality in content marketing, his “Content Marketing Wheel” strategy and the most-overlooked metric for measuring content marketing ROI.

Innovation in content marketing isn’t about inventing wild new things or new ways of doing something.

What are three lessons you’ve learned that you believe have made you a better content marketer in your journey from Digital Strategist at Google, to VP of Platform & Content at NextView Ventures?

  1. All content marketing is supposed to be solving the same problems for your customers that your product does.
  1. Innovation in content marketing isn’t about inventing wild new things or new ways of doing something. Instead, I take my cues from Ev Williams (founder of Medium, Twitter, and Blogger) who said about innovation: “Take a human desire … and use modern technology to remove steps.” If you line up all the steps your buyer takes to do something, you can suddenly see all kinds of creative ways your content can be helpful and relevant and stand out more than the competition’s.
  1. Have a strong point of view! Ever since I started inserting my voice more strongly into my personal blog, and using really unique tones, storytelling styles, and angles on NextView’s podcast, only good things have happened.

Drive traffic to that pillar piece, which again, is built to hit your KPIs and built to be the most educational or entertaining piece for your buyer.

Can you provide a high-level description of ‘The Content Marketing Wheel’ and share how you believe it helps marketers get the most value out of core content marketing assets?

In one sentence, the content marketing wheel is about creating a single pillar piece (the hub) and then orienting all your marketing activity around that piece (the spokes) to drive traffic to it.

More specifically, you first create a core resource — some call this a pillar piece. The topic of the piece is driven by your audience, while the format is driven by your goals. If your audience thinks blogging is difficult, then you can teach them to blog more easily through any type of content, format aside. But if your goals are, say, broad awareness, than an infographic trumps other formats, while a gated eBook might be better for lead-gen.

Second, with that piece as your “hub,” you then orient your marketing around that resource for a time. The “spokes” that make up your distribution are tactics that feel natural to a marketer, but they now have a purpose and all topically relate to the original resource. For instance, your blog pipeline is easier to fill with ideas based on that bigger, pillar piece (excerpts, topical tangents, related news, repackaging to new mediums, etc.). And other channels like email, social, paid distribution, search, and third parties (PR, co-marketing partners, and guest publishing) all focus on either distributing that core piece or smaller pieces that relate.

Lastly, all of those “spokes” exist for one reason: Drive traffic to that pillar piece, which again, is built to hit your KPIs and built to be the most educational or entertaining piece for your buyer.

The Content Marketing Wheel helps you codify your work and stay relevant, creative, organized, and prolific.

What are three actionable takeaways that you want arm your audience members with after your presentation “The Content Wheel: Sustaining Momentum with Greater ROI While Punching Unicorns in the Face” at CMW?

This playbook really helps with three core things that we’ll discuss together:

  1. How to be relevant to BOTH your audience’s needs or desires and your own goals.
  1. How to be sustainable with your publishing. It can be really hard to continually publish content, especially for folks who don’t wake up eager to write and create things in the morning.
  1. How to be lean about this. I work with startups and have run this playbook dozens of times with them. Ditto for larger companies at which I’ve worked. This Wheel idea helps you codify your work and stay relevant, creative, organized, and prolific — but you can easily launch and iterate on the exact execution as you learn from your work.

(Oh, and as a bonus, I will teach you how to punch a unicorn in the face. Like, right in their big dumb faces.)

Bring lead-gen data to open the discussion, but close your boss by demonstrating an understanding of your L2CC metrics.

What do you think are the most often overlooked KPIs in determining content marketing success?

If I had to pick just one KPI, I’d say we greatly overlook lead-to-customer conversion (L2CC) rates in B2B. At the time I was leaving HubSpot, where I was head of content for a time, the company was heavily focused on that and rightfully so. Knowing which pieces convert people from leads to MQLs or SQLs or from leads to customers is invaluable. Want more budget for B2B content? Bring lead-gen data to open the discussion, but close your boss by demonstrating an understanding of your L2CC metrics.

The “right” mentality is to view content as a means to more efficiently scale your marketing a few months down the road.

In your role at NextView Ventures you oversee education and business development for many of NextView’s portfolio companies. What content marketing challenges have you found to be unique to this group of startup companies?

My biggest two challenges are getting founders and startup marketers to think about content with the right mentality while also balancing the near-term, scrappy, non-scalable tactics they need to do that fall under “marketing” at a startup. The “right” mentality is to view content as a means to more efficiently scale your marketing a few months down the road, since it’s far more beneficial to create a collection of useful content that continues to get engagement, rather than try to publish one hit after another, each needing to “beat” the last one.

What resources do you rely on most to stay current with content marketing trends?

Joe Pulizzi and Robert Rose’s podcast, This Old Marketing, is invaluable because of how they run down the big news in our industry.

I also use a personal, private Twitter list, subscribe to 8-10 blogs in Feedly, and receive Digiday’s newsletter.

Thanks, Jay!

Ready to Create Blockbuster Content Marketing?

Reserve your space at Content Marketing World 2015  for strategic presentations from 200 superstars in the marketing industry.

Get a sneak preview of Jay and 12 other marketing superstars’ presentations with our new eBook, Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing.


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
Learn How to Land Your Content a Leading Role: Jay Acunzo of NextView Ventures #CMWorld | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Learn How to Land Your Content a Leading Role: Jay Acunzo of NextView Ventures #CMWorld appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

13 Experts Discuss Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing

CMW-The-Star-of-Your-Marketing-eBook

“Personality is the glitter that sends your little gleam across the footlights and the orchestra pit into that big black space where the audience is.” –Mae West

We may not know the names of actors like Sylvester Stallone, Mel Gibson and Jon Heder if it were not for their breakout roles in movies like Rocky, Mad Max and Napoleon Dynamite. Not only did these movies serve as a launching pad for major acting careers, but they also have something else in common. They were all low budget films that ended up being a phenomenal success.

In the same vein, many marketers are searching for a way to make content marketing the star of their digital marketing programs. Content marketing provides an excellent opportunity for marketers to tell their organization’s story with the personality and authenticity that engages an audience. Many times, though, marketers struggle to find a voice that expresses the brand, and the personality ends up on the cutting room floor.

To help you make your content marketing a box-office success, we proudly present the second eBook in our triple feature, Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing. This feature combines the silver-screen glamour of old Hollywood with up-to-the-minute advice from some of the top names in the content marketing industry. Each of these marketing superstars will be presenting at Content Marketing World 2015 in September, but you can get a sneak preview now.

In this feature, you’ll discover strategies for:

  • Creating compelling content
  • Aligning content with your audience’s needs
  • Bringing B2C personality to B2B marketing
  • Publishing and promoting your content

Movies like The Godfather: Part II and Toy Story 2 prove that sometimes, the sequel is just as good as the original. Here are just a few memorable quotes from our second feature, in handy tweetable form:

AH0615

Ann Handley – MarketingProfs

“Be a content marketing star: Create quality content, find your brand voice & share results.” @annhandley tweet this

jr0615

Jeffrey Rohrs – Salesforce

“Scene stealing content marketing is sales activated, marketing promoted, optimized & reported.” @jkrohrs tweet this

JD0615

Juntae DeLane – University of Southern California

“To be a star in search, content marketers MUST consider SEO when developing content.” @juntaedelane tweet this

JL0615

Justin Levy – Citrix

“Always focus on measuring & communicating the business value of the content you’re creating.” @justinlevy tweet this

JAY0615

Jay Acunzo – NextView Ventures

“For star-making content, use a content marketing wheel “hub & spoke” for publishing & promotion.” @Jay_zo  tweet this

amyh0615

Amy Higgins – Zendesk

“Before publishing content, follow a launch plan checklist to make sure you haven’t left out steps.” @amywhiggins tweet this

MARK0615

Mark Wilson – Blackberry

“Good content marketing will appeal to customers’ rational & emotional sides.” Mark Wilson @BlackBerry tweet this

MITCH0615

Mitch Joel – Mirum

“In order for content marketing to be effective, distribution must be king. And queen.” @mitchjoel tweet this

AMANDA0615

Amanda Todorovich – Cleveland Clinic

“Earn support for content marketing resources by sharing metrics & data with stakeholders.” @amandatodo tweet this

MAGGIE0615

Maggie Burke – EMC Corporation

“To capture audience attention, combine real people, compelling stories & quality video content.” @maggieemctv tweet this

DOUG0615

Doug Kessler – Velocity

“Content marketers anthem: I promise to serve my audience with remarkable & strategic content!” @dougkessler tweet this

ARNIE0615

Arnie Kuenn – Vertical Measures

“For content success, create content that people are searching for, measure & explain the value.” @arniek tweet this

KEN0615

Ken Wincko – PR Newswire

“Successful content needs to be the 3 C’s: Credible, Compelling & Consistent.” @KenWincko tweet this

Catch the Full Feature Below:

CMWorld 2015 eBooks

If you missed the first featured eBook in this series on Content Marketing Strategy, you can view it on-demand now on SlideShare.

Also, remember to prepare yourself for the thrilling conclusion to this triple feature of content marketing awesome with, Measuring Your Content Marketing Box Office Success, coming June 22nd to computer or mobile phone screen near you (or in your pocket).

Be sure to visit the Content Marketing World website to learn more about the conference and reserve your seat for the big show.


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
13 Experts Discuss Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post 13 Experts Discuss Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Where Social Media and SEO Fit in Today’s Content Marketing Mix

Search Social Content Marketing

Whether your role is in search, social media, marketing communications or PR, the importance of content marketing is unmistakable.

Brand content budgets and participation are up with the vast majority of B2C and B2B marketers now using content marketing. The industry is coming together on best practices and organizations are evolving their structures to include roles like Chief Content Officer and Brand Journalist.

While there is growing synergy between search, social media and content marketing, they don’t often function collaboratively in organizations. There are also some misconceptions about what content marketing really is.

This post will dig in to some of the realities of incorporating an integrated approach that leverages the best of search, social media and content marketing, while dispelling some of the myths that keep integrated efforts apart.

Be the Best Answer

Optimized, socialized, publicized and influencer activated content is essential for reaching information hungry, multi-tasking audiences who are bombarded with new messages every day. In order for brands to be credible and prominent on the search and social web for their customers, they’ll need to understand the best of each discipline and how to put them together. SEO can deliver content-rich answers to buyers at the moment of need, and social media can provide the means to connect and engage. Both publicity and influencer relations provide credibility and reach. All rely on content to achieve success.

While many marketers will debate what comes first, content, social media or SEO, the most practical approach is to use the tactics necessary for your target audience in order to “be the best answer” wherever customers are looking.

SEO is the Condiment, Not the Sandwich

More than keywords and links, search engine optimization is an important part of the success equation when it comes to content marketing. While SEO has traditionally been able to drive online marketing performance on its own, search engine updates to address content quality and the more conversational nature of search behavior have combined with the growing popularity of social networks to change the SEO landscape forever.

Think of SEO this way: If a customer-focused content marketing program is the sandwich, then SEO is the mayonnaise. It touches nearly everything and enhances the overall flavor of the sandwich. But on it’s own, not very appetizing.

SEO for Content or Content for SEO?

Many SEO-turned content marketers are focused on creating more content or creating content as a means to attract links. This is a similar approach as when social media became popular in the SEO world. Social networks and media use was focused on attracting attention to further attract links, not to create relationships, engagement or inspire transactions and referrals.

A simple comparison tells the tale: Having 500 optimized blog posts on every derivative of a 50 phrase keyword list that no one wants to read is no more useful than attracting 50,000 drive-by visitors to your site for 10 seconds each from Reddit. Being held accountable to superficial performance metrics drives superficial tactics. Do you really want your marketing characterized as superficial?

Understanding the difference between mechanical tactics and meaningful outcomes is an important distinction when hiring content marketing professionals or a content marketing agency. It can mean the difference between a keyword hell of thin content, or a content portfolio that serves real customer interests and proudly represents what your brand stands for.

Optimize Your Opportunities

Search marketers are, by their nature, opportunists. Each time a major trend in online marketing emerges, from blogging to social media, SEOs have adapted and engineered their way to discover every possible workaround or tactic to create a marketing advantage. This opportunism has extended to content marketing as well.

Operating within the guidelines of quality marketing, such adaptability is a highly valuable perspective to take. However, when opportunism bleeds into manipulations outside the scope of search engine guidelines, the risks can turn out to be painful and sometimes disastrous to a business.

But here’s the thing: Google is a battleground for SEOs and those with real, on the ground experience that have been able to adapt successfully can become some of the most valuable marketers you will ever find.

Being both creative and analytical as well as lateral thinkers, marketers with an optimized state of mind are particularly adept at finding solutions to complex marketing problems. But those SEOs that are still stuck on content marketing as “more fuel for keywords” and social media as “link building” should probably be avoided.

Social vs. SEO Focused Content Marketing

There are any number of benefits for engaging a SEO focused agency for content marketing compared to a social media agency. They each play essential roles for content amplification at all stages of the buying cycle. Here are a few common characteristics of each:

SEO Focused Content Marketing

  • Tactical approach: more content equals more search presence
  • Topics derived from actual search demand
  • Keyword managed content plans tied to performance
  • Continuous cycle of performance improvement using search analytics
  • Organic amplification is “built-in” to content creation
  • Content promotion, link building and social promotion
  • Good SEO is good user experience
  • Technical optimization
  • Performance is focused on search KPIs and conversions

Social Media Focused Content Marketing

  • Topics focused on brand and messaging
  • Shorter form content: status updates, blog posts, image tiles
  • Topics managed by social content calendar
  • Social monitoring surfaces new, real-time content opportunities
  • Amplification is often organic but increasingly paid
  • Influencers engaged to co-create and promote through social
  • Performance is based on views and engagement
  • Conversion and ROI are more difficult to measure with confidence

What should companies look for with search and social media when considering content marketing resources?

Goals and accountability are essential for an optimized and socialized content marketing program to succeed. For an integrated approach, here are three of your most important considerations to ensure content performs for customers and your brand.

  1. Attract –  How will the particular content object attract exposure? Will your content perform as part of an ongoing narrative? Will it be a part of a sequence? Will it be connected to other content objects through links, repurposing or curation? Where content is promoted on social networks will matter for attraction as much as what phrases and questions are used for search engine optimization.
  1. Engage – How will the content object be meaningful to the reader such that they interact, react and respond to it?  What context needs to exist in order for the content to be so relevant that it inspires action? Social Media and Search both play a role in developing the context for engagement. When they interact with what they find, does the customer think, “Yes, that’s exactly what I was looking for”, or something else?
  1. Convert – How will the optimized content object persuade the reader to take the next step? Each content object can play a role in guiding the reader from one stage to the next in a brand and customer relationship. From awareness to purchase to advocacy, conversions are happening at each stage whether it’s a social share, subscribing to a newsletter, downloading a white paper, signing up for a webinar, filling out an inquiry form or making a referral.

Within your content plan, think about how you can make these actions easy and intentional for the target customer.  An optimized content plan means being accountable to discovery, how it’s best consumed and what messages will inspire action.

Remember, content is the reason search began in the first place.  Take an optimized approach to incorporating search, social media, publicity and influencers with your content marketing programs. Make sure your content is accountable for attraction, engagement and conversion. With that focus on accountability, the investment you make in high quality, optimized and socialized content will pay returns over and over again.

If you haven’t read it yet, be sure to check out Optimize for a full plan on developing an integrated content marketing program.

Image: Shutterstock


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
Where Social Media and SEO Fit in Today’s Content Marketing Mix | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Where Social Media and SEO Fit in Today’s Content Marketing Mix appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

How To Make A DIY Solar Panel



(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

The economic vitality is essential for both individuals and earth. As a family unit, with the possibility of saving money for electricity bills is an extraordinary method of management. Rather than spend more money in fees, they can put something aside for emergencies. The vitality of the economy can also save the earth. It hurts when power plants one little power is turned on. However the use of less energy can make a huge show on earth homes.

How to make a solar panel?

These are the things that you can easily find at home or near the tool shop, you could make a solar panel to help progress towards the environment and economical. Here progress Making a board of sunshine fed and the things you need:

Sheet metal clippers

Copper flashing piece of ½ feet

Glass vessels or plastic flasks

Tap water

Electronic drill, sand paper

Electronic burner

Alligator clip leads

Micro-ammeter

Safety spectacles

Table salt

Steps to Make:

Use sandpaper to reduce the signs of consumption of copper and completely clean fire. At this point, metal cutting shears so that he would coordinate with the burner.

Put the light on burner and cook for at least 30 minutes to make the copper oxide dark thick enough. When a decent coverage of the copper oxide framed, let cool until chips.

Clean the copper cooled with tap water, however, gradually to the fact that the type of red copper oxide, which has shaped the heating another bright copper away.Cut not the same size as little time recently. Gator with clasps, join the two letters he has done inside the glass container with a wide opening and a plastic container with a higher court. The tips should not touch each other and the curve with the state of the glass or carafe.

Join the crocodile’s head cut extravagant annexed intact on the positive side of the unit. Clasp changed to the plate with the copper oxide must be connected to the negative side. Make an arrangement and salt water. Make a response that can adequately splash motherboards. Fasteners must be between the hammer and the anvil.

Place in the sun and perceive how you can make the leap from the gauge. Then you can use it to help power different machines.

So if you want to organize electricity to effective and affordable then this is the best idea for you, especially when you think about decorating the dining room or formal living room in a professional manner.

Interview: Content Strategy Words of Wisdom from Kristina Halvorson #CMWorld

KH---interview-header-V2

When it comes to content strategy for the web, Kristina Halvorson wrote the book. Literally. Now in its second edition, Content Strategy for the Web is widely recognized as the go-to resource for content strategists all over the world. Kristina is also the CEO and Founder of Brain Traffic, and the founder of the Confab conference series.

We sat down with Kristina in advance of her upcoming keynote presentation at Content Marketing World (September 8-11) for her no-nonsense, no-holds-barred-or-prisoners-taken opinion on the current state of content marketing. Read on for her thoughts on challenges content marketers face, how to really listen to customers, and why a sensible marketing approach is better than a sexy one.

When you first founded Brian Traffic, were you planning on becoming a content strategist?

No, I started out as a freelance copywriter. The reason I picked BrainTraffic.com was there were too many ways to misspell KristinaHalvorson.com. So my only goal was to figure out how to make a living as a freelance web copywriter. My, how things have changed!

What are you passionate about in regards to content marketing and content strategy?

I’m really interested in advocating for going beyond “we’ve got to deliver valuable content to build a customer relationship.” I think we need to take several steps back and find out what the customer wants from us.

Everyone is so enthusiastic about content marketing that it can be difficult to ask the tough questions. But I think we need to be really brave about asking those questions and willing to hear what the answers are. It’s easy to get excited about tactical stuff, and start executing without asking really tough questions about what is and is not something we should be spending money on.

What are some of the top-line measurement opportunities that warrant a lot of attention? What metrics should content marketers be concerned with?

Well, first I should say my work as a content strategist is not only in marketing. We work with folks all across the board, so marketing is only one part of what we do. But no matter what industry you’re in, there is always an end user. There’s a customer, even if it’s an internal customer or an employee.

So the shared metric across the board is customer satisfaction, for me. I think we need to look at sales support as part of the equation. We should be retrieving and reviewing ongoing customer feedback to really measure our content success.

I think customer satisfaction is very difficult to measure on the very front end of customer engagement when we’re still doing awareness and discovery phases. It becomes about getting people’s attention or getting the referral. So the follow-up needs to go beyond the lip service we sometimes pay to sales support.

What does content success mean to our customers?

I think that it only falls into a couple of categories. One is post-sales support. By that I mean ongoing customer relationship support, not just “engagement.” It’s a huge area we sometimes miss as purveyors of content. There are no blanket strategies or tactical initiatives that make sense for everyone.

Like, we often hear “there is no marketing left but content marketing.” That’s a blanket statement which may not apply to every single brand. Like, if my kid has a toothache, I’m not going to Crest.com to read about what to do. But at the same time, if I’m shopping at Banana Republic, I sure do want to read an article.

What are some of the challenges facing organizations as they develop a content strategy?

There is a lot of pressure to go after the next big thing: You’ve got to be on Facebook; you’ve got to be on Twitter; you’ve got to be on Vine. People are scrambling from thing to thing. Then suddenly you have content in a lot of different places and you haven’t touched it in years.

Our company infrastructures are not set up to deal with our websites, let alone any gigantic content marketing commitment. Sometimes, people rush after new opportunities without really cleaning house first. Businesses can end up spread thin across the content marketing landscape. And who decided that was what their customers wanted?

What does a successful situation look like, where someone is approaching content with a customer in mind?

I think that a real opportunity and one that is really difficult to get is going and asking customers “what do you want?” Because oftentimes the answer is either critical of what we’ve been delivering, or it has nothing to do with what we have been marketing.

And I also think it’s easier to listen to more things we could build versus more things we could fix. A lot of the stuff we should be doing for customer support is just not that sexy. Marketers are aspirational, we want creative opportunity, we are curious individuals who want an outlet for brand expression, and to represent what we spend day-in and day-out doing. And if our customer says, “put your coupon offer on your home page” versus “your fancy Instagram account,” that’s not as sexy. But that’s the kind of feedback we need to hear to be effective.

What’s the most common advice you find yourself giving in a marketing context related to content strategy?

Talk to your users. Over and over and over. Talk to them. Don’t run a poll. Don’t do “social listening.” Because then you’re only going to hear the super unhappy or the super happy people, not the people who don’t really care, whose attention we’re trying to get. Go out and just talk to them.

I think the number one reason we don’t talk to our customers is we’re really afraid of what they’re going to say. The number one thing they might say is “I don’t care.” But that’s exactly what we need to know.

Who comes to your mind as a great example of an organization listening to customers and taking action in the way they’re creating content?

Speaking as a consumer, somebody who has delivered useful content since way before the internet is USAA. I would expect based on their bundle of services and their niche market that they would be delivering very custom, targeted, educational content. And that comes in the form of their magazine. I still get their print magazine. They’re one of the original content marketers.

Room & Board send their people on the delivery trucks into people’s homes to find out how they live, what they want, what makes them happy. They’re seeing in a real setting how people use their products.

Would you say content strategy is more important than ever, with the content production overload that exists today?

Oh yes. The role of a content strategist is to help launch a scalable, sustainable content marketing program within your organization in context of everything else you’re already committed to, keeping in mind the skill-sets you have. Or, maybe after you do an analysis, you decide to make less of a commitment because there are other priorities.

The role of a content strategist is ensuring that business goals are very clearly articulated, that user needs and what they want from your product/service have been clearly articulated. We help identify scalability, internal capability, realistically what it’s going to take to make this happen. And then helping organizations to make decisions not only about what they are going to do, but what they’re not going to do. It’s making sure the content plan is in line with what, ultimately, the end user wants and needs.

Reserve your space at Content Marketing World (September 8-11) to hear Kristina Halvorson’s keynote, as well as insights from over 200 content marketing thought leaders.

For more content marketing strategies that don’t require booking a flight to Cleveland, read the full eBook, The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy.


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
Interview: Content Strategy Words of Wisdom from Kristina Halvorson #CMWorld | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Interview: Content Strategy Words of Wisdom from Kristina Halvorson #CMWorld appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

13 Marketing Stars Show The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy

The-Big-Picture-of-Content-Marketing-Strategy-Cover

“Nothing is impossible. The word itself says, ‘I’m possible!’” –Audrey Hepburn

Content marketing can quickly become a whirlwind of creation, promotion and evolution of tactics. New platforms are constantly popping up and directives can change at the top of a hat. So, it’s no surprise when content campaigns become disorganized and lose focus.

If your content marketing isn’t having the impact it could, you’re not alone: Only 37% of B2C and 38% of B2B marketers say their content marketing is effective.

If you are in the vast majority of marketers who aren’t sure their performance is Oscar-worthy, the Content Marketing Institute is here to help with a dose of old-school Hollywood magic.

As part of the run-up to Content Marketing World 2015, we have rounded up some of the biggest stars in the content marketing world for the first eBook in our trilogy titled “The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy”.

In this eBook, you will learn tips for maximizing your content marketing effectiveness at each stage of the process. If that wasn’t enough, you’ll also have access to advice on building a solid content strategy from the thorough planning that lays the groundwork for success, to the amplification that helps your killer content reach your audience.

Whether or not you can make it to Content Marketing World’s star-studded premiere, this eBook has plenty of blockbuster insights. Below is a sneak preview of of what you’ll find from these content marketing stars, in handy tweetable form:

eBook-one-blog-post-image

Robert Rose: “Content marketing strategy has everything to do with your business, but rarely your product.” @Robert Rose tweet this

Sarah Compagnoni: “Great content marketing strategy starts well before anyone clicks a link.” @saracompagnoni tweet this

Chris Moody: “To improve your content marketing, use customer feedback to inspire blog content.” @cnmoody tweet this

Cleve Gibbon: “Content marketing tactics without strategy is noise before defeat.” @cleveg tweet this

Joanne Cleaver: “Freelancers are a ‘halo’ of content talent for thinly staffed agencies & companies.” @jcleaver tweet this

Carlos Abler: “Become your customer’s hero by using archetypes to find the best fit for their needs.” @Carlos_Abler tweet this

Jay Baer: “Like trying to cut your hair sans mirror, content w/o strategy is possible, but not advisable.” @JayBaer tweet this

John Jantsch: “Today, SEO doesn’t really exist outside the context of content marketing strategy.” @ducttape tweet this

Loren McDonald: “Develop “umbrella” content that can be leveraged into multiple forms.” “@LorenMcDonald tweet this

Kristina Halvorson: “Marketers need to advocate beyond content delivery & focus on building customer relationships.” @halvorson tweet this

Brian Clark: “Put yourself in the customers’  shoes to experience the journey from their perspective.” @brianclark tweet this

James Moat: “The power of employees generating & sharing content is a greatly undervalued strategy.” @digecomm tweet this

David Beebe: “Content marketing is about serving customers something valuable & creating raving fans.” @davidbeebe tweet this

Ready For Your Close Up? “Watch” the Full Feature Below:

Preview of Coming Attractions

Coming up next is the dynamic middle installment of the content marketing trilogy, “Making Content Marketing the Star of Your Marketing”, is coming to a laptop, mobile device or tablet near you on June 15. And don’t miss the thrilling final chapter, Measuring Your Content Marketing Box Office Success, on June 22.

ebook CMW preview

This September 8th-11th, CMWorld 2015 brings the glitz and glamour of Old Hollywood to Cleveland, Ohio. To learn more about the conference and reserve your place on the red carpet, visit the Content Marketing World website.

Lights, camera, action!


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
13 Marketing Stars Show The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post 13 Marketing Stars Show The Big Picture of Content Marketing Strategy appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Online Marketing News: Buy Button Bonanza, Everyone’s Getting ‘Near Me’, Facebook Snags The Spend

Engage Your Visitors

How to Write Better Titles Using Data-Driven Strategies [Infographic] – How much time did you put into the title of your last blog post? If your answer was, “Not much,” don’t worry — it’s often the most overlooked component of content. Check out this infographic to learn more. Search Engine Journal

Google Says “Near Me” Searches Have Doubled This Year – Search queries that contain a location qualifier such as “nearby” or “near me” have doubled in the past year, according to Google Trends data from March. Eighty percent of those searches come from mobile devices. Search Engine Land

STUDY: Different Engagement for Different Types of Content on Facebook – Do different types of content on Facebook lead to different types of engagement? Social media news aggregator NewsWhip has the answer. SocialTimes

Twitter Brings Programmatic to Social With Amplify Update – The microblogging service has introduced a program called Auto Amplify. The new feature reduces lots of manual work and helps brands better manage their campaigns in real time. ClickZ

Facebook Video Soars Past 4 Billion Daily Views – Showing no signs of slowing, daily video views on Facebook have jumped 1 billion since January. Marketing Land

Twitter Unveils Official Consulting Partners: IBM Is First Up – IBM has worked with Twitter as a strategic partner since October, and the relationship has helped the social-data purveyor recognize something important: Twitter needs more preferred consulting partners. Ad Age

Pinterest Unveils New ‘Action Buttons’ – The social networking site revealed the plan for its long-awaited revenue-generating feature. Inc.

The Majority of B2B Companies Are Using Incomplete Data – Almost three quarters of the records in B2B marketing databases are inaccurate or incomplete, according to a new study by Dun & Bradstreet NetProspex. Direct Marketing News

Twitter Unveils New Audience Insights Dashboard – Twitter is looking to entice more advertisers to the platform with a new Audience Insights dashboard, covering a wide range of analytics options. Similar to Facebook insights, Audience Insights includes an overview of various demographics, interests and purchase behaviour data, enabling Twitter advertisers to dig deeper into their audience and better target their content – both through paid and non-paid means. Twitter

Facebook Accounted For 75% Of Social Ad Spending Globally In 2014 – The global social advertising market grew 41% to $15.3 billion in 2014; Facebook is maintaining dominance despite lack of presence in the giant China market. Marketing Land

STUDY: Interaction with Instagram Posts Trounces Facebook, Twitter – When it comes to interaction with posts, Instagram blows away parent company Facebook and Twitter, according to a recent study by social analytics provider Quintly. SocialTimes

Uber Partners With Foursquare to Combine Local Search and Transportation – Uber has formed yet another partnership, this time with local search recommendation app, Foursquare, that will give the car service an even greater advantage over competitors like Lyft and Curb. Search Engine Watch

Facebook Adds “Call Now” Click-to-Call Feature to Newsfeed Ads – Local advertisers now have a new tool for converting social network users to leads and sales, thanks to Facebook’s new ‘Call Now’ button for News Feed ads. Mobile users who tap the button call the business immediately. Social Media Today

Google Confirms “Buy” Button Is Coming To Search Ads – Google has just confirmed the report that it will enable “buy now” buttons on some mobile ads. Marketing Land

What were the top online and digital marketing news stories for you this week?

Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!

Infographic: Marketing Domination Media


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the

TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2015. |
Online Marketing News: Buy Button Bonanza, Everyone’s Getting ‘Near Me’, Facebook Snags The Spend | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Online Marketing News: Buy Button Bonanza, Everyone’s Getting ‘Near Me’, Facebook Snags The Spend appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.